Great feedback on the Women in Bio SciArt panel

One of the people attending the SciArt exhibit I organized with Women in Bio (WIB) was the executive vice president of corporate communications from my former employer.  She has been a great colleague, who actually aided in me joining the wonderful community of WIB in the first place.  After attending the event, she wrote up an article about the event and posted it on the company’s internal website.  It turned out to be a big hit!

Here are the kind words she had to say:

New York Women in Bio: “The Intersection of Art and Science”

On July 26, the local chapter of Women in Bio held a panel conversation / gallery show to discuss an unexpected topic – how the seemingly opposite fields of art and science are increasingly coming together in recent years.

Several scientist artists exhibited their work and participated in a panel discussion moderated by Yana Zorina, one of Acorda’s former scientists, and an inspired artist herself! Here are several examples of her work, some inspired by the research she did at Acorda, specifically on our M22 program. (It’s a whole new way to look at oligodendrocytes!)

Yana says that art was her first passion, growing up, and it wasn’t until she went to college that she became serious about a career in science. However, as time went on and her studies and career in science took precedence, she still looked for a creative output. Eventually, she began to marry some of the creative work she did in beads to the scientific images she was developing, and the rest is history!

I’m pleased to report that Yana has just begun work at Memorial Sloan Kettering as part of a two-year RNAi project. (If I can paraphrase Will Ferrell’s Mugatu in Zoolander, “RNAi, it’s so hot right now.”)

Congratulations to Yana on both of these accomplishments!

I am so very grateful for her continued support!

Women in Bio Panel – “The Intersection of Art and Science” – Part 2

Last month I wrote a post about an event I organized with Women in Bio called “The Intersection of Art and Science”.  There I moderated a panel of female artists who use scientific concepts as inspiration for their artwork.  On top of organizing a panel, we also decided to do something different and actually set up a small exhibit of the panelists’ art pieces.  We set up several easels on a table in a conference room and WHALA!  It was a huge hit! Continue Reading

Trade offs

As I have written in a couple of recent posts (here, here and here), life has been a bit hectic recently.  I have been feeling like I am having science withdrawal symptoms.  Last week, I have finally received an offer for a new position that I have accepted.  For the last 4 years, while I absolutely loved my job, it took me over 1.5 hours to commute in each direction.  I wasn’t the favorite part of my day and took a lot of valuable time away from my work, family and personal life.  Not to mention NeuroBeadContinue Reading

The inner mind

Last weekend, I attended the Eifman ballet in New York City Theater – “Tchaikovsky:  The Mystery of Life and Death”.  Unlike the vast majority of ballets I have seen before, that are centered around a fictional story such as the “Nutcracker” or “Swan Lake”, this production was quite different.  It was an outsider’s view of the inner world of the great Russian composer.

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Adrift 

This single word describes my current state quite accurately.  In the beginning of April, an unpredictable event knocked the ground out from under my feet.  Due to unfortunate external circumstances, the place I loved working at had to drastically downsize its staff in order to stay afloat.  As my daughter likes to sing “like a small boat on the ocean”, I have been drifting ever since.

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“The Internal Storm”

Last week I wrote about a slightly unexpected turn that my work has taken.  I have been posting pictures of my work in progress and finished pieces on Instagram, where I found quite a few of like-minded individuals.  Most of these people are trained as scientists and want to share the beauty of what they are doing with the rest of the world.  But as would probably be expected, most of this work gets noticed and appreciated by people who do something similar themselves – other scientists and artists. Continue Reading

Bridging science, art and society

Last year, when I founded NeuroBead, I based it on the idea that scientists like myself would want to see beautiful images from their research commemorated as pieces of art, that they could display on their walls.  Many academic institutions, especially neuroscience departments, decorate their hallways with enlarged photos of cells that were taken under a microscope.  These images are both gorgeous to look at and representative of the great scientific discoveries achieved by the researchers.  They deserve to be preserved and remembered.  Many departments and microscopy facilities even send out calls for best image competitions.  I wanted to take this process one step further and portray this integration of science and visual art in a more creative form. Continue Reading