Abstract art

I have never been a fan of abstract art.  When I was about 10, my parents took me to Florida for the first time.  While there, we took a day trip to St. Petersburg to visit the Salvador Dali museum.  I felt lost and thought that the paintings were pointless.  My parents said that it might take a more mature age to understand such art.   Continue Reading

The many faces of sciart

Two weeks ago I attended a very interesting art exhibit entitled “EmBodied”.  It was organized by the SciArt Center that I have written about in an earlier post.  I came across it by accident, but just in time to make it to the opening reception.  Incidentally, as I was approaching the gallery, the following sign caught my eye.  It gave me a pretty good laugh, considering where I was heading. Continue Reading

“The Internal Storm”

Last week I wrote about a slightly unexpected turn that my work has taken.  I have been posting pictures of my work in progress and finished pieces on Instagram, where I found quite a few of like-minded individuals.  Most of these people are trained as scientists and want to share the beauty of what they are doing with the rest of the world.  But as would probably be expected, most of this work gets noticed and appreciated by people who do something similar themselves – other scientists and artists. Continue Reading

Bridging science, art and society

Last year, when I founded NeuroBead, I based it on the idea that scientists like myself would want to see beautiful images from their research commemorated as pieces of art, that they could display on their walls.  Many academic institutions, especially neuroscience departments, decorate their hallways with enlarged photos of cells that were taken under a microscope.  These images are both gorgeous to look at and representative of the great scientific discoveries achieved by the researchers.  They deserve to be preserved and remembered.  Many departments and microscopy facilities even send out calls for best image competitions.  I wanted to take this process one step further and portray this integration of science and visual art in a more creative form. Continue Reading

Red Blood Cell – hair clip # 4

It has been a while since I have given an update on my beadwork.  While I was working on the hair clips I have described in my previous posts here, here and here, my older daughter suggested a new idea.  She has all of the symptoms of a child raised by scientists.  Her most recent writing project in school focused on explaining how vaccines work!  She has been fascinated with our “Bring your kid to work day” and has tried doing some simple experiments in museums and at home.  She has also admired my artwork and has tried to get involved.


So when she saw me making biological hair clips in the form of cells,she requested a Red Blood Cell!  Red blood cells are unique in that unlike all other cells they do not have a nucleus and have a slightly “pinched” morphology.  They are responsible for carrying oxygen through our blood stream.

Here is a little bit of behind the process and how the clip turned out.  I love the simple elegance that it projects!


To see more of my work, please follow me on Instagram and check out my Etsy shop!

Stress Fibers – hair clip # 3

Here is the next piece in the series.  It was inspired by the following image, which unfortunately did not have a description.  While I cannot say for sure, the filaments labeled in yellow reminded me of stress fibers.

Stress fibers consist of actin microfilaments and act like tiny muscles inside the cell, allowing the cell to change its shape, contract, and migrate to its ultimate destination. The name “stress fibers” comes from the fact that these structures are often observed in cells that have undergone mechanical stress.

 

If you have a favorite image, I am more than happy to take custom orders and make a striking conversation starter for you!

To see more work in this series, please follow me on Instagram and Facebook!

Also, don’t forget to check out my Etsy Shop!

 

Filamentous Fibroblast – # 2 in the series

Here is my 2nd creation for the girls’ hair clip series.  It is a simplified version of a beautiful image of mouse fibroblasts that made it on the list of “35 Years of the World’s Best Microscope Photography”

While I could not recreate the whole glory of these cells in a small hair clip, I think that I have captured the essence of their elaborate cytoskeletal arrangements.

filamentous-fibroblast

This image is also unique in that it does not use traditional colors of microscopy (blue, red and green).  The balance of its delicate structures and the pastel colors used to pseudocolor the image, make it even more breathtaking.

Fibroblasts are one the most common and easily accessible cell types in the body, yet they hold great promise in regenerative medicine.  These cells can be isolated from a patient’s skin biopsy and then reprogrammed into stem cells to replace lost or diseased tissue, making them a gold mine of possibilities.

If you have a favorite image, I am more than happy to take custom orders and make a striking conversation starter for you!