Trade offs

As I have written in a couple of recent posts (here, here and here), life has been a bit hectic recently.  I have been feeling like I am having science withdrawal symptoms.  Last week, I have finally received an offer for a new position that I have accepted.  For the last 4 years, while I absolutely loved my job, it took me over 1.5 hours to commute in each direction.  I wasn’t the favorite part of my day and took a lot of valuable time away from my work, family and personal life.  Not to mention NeuroBeadContinue Reading

Abstract art

I have never been a fan of abstract art.  When I was about 10, my parents took me to Florida for the first time.  While there, we took a day trip to St. Petersburg to visit the Salvador Dali museum.  I felt lost and thought that the paintings were pointless.  My parents said that it might take a more mature age to understand such art.   Continue Reading

Left brain, right brain and dyslexia

In my recent posts I described how my work at NeuroBead has taken an unexpected turn towards raising patient awareness, rather than just portraying scientific progress.   Soon after finishing my work on “The Internal Storm” epilepsy project, I was contacted by a former collaborator I knew from an entrepreneurial initiative that I was involved in during my postdoctoral training.  After seeing my artwork being used for raising epilepsy awareness, she asked if I would be willing to make a dyslexia pin. Continue Reading

The many faces of sciart

Two weeks ago I attended a very interesting art exhibit entitled “EmBodied”.  It was organized by the SciArt Center that I have written about in an earlier post.  I came across it by accident, but just in time to make it to the opening reception.  Incidentally, as I was approaching the gallery, the following sign caught my eye.  It gave me a pretty good laugh, considering where I was heading. Continue Reading

“The Internal Storm”

Last week I wrote about a slightly unexpected turn that my work has taken.  I have been posting pictures of my work in progress and finished pieces on Instagram, where I found quite a few of like-minded individuals.  Most of these people are trained as scientists and want to share the beauty of what they are doing with the rest of the world.  But as would probably be expected, most of this work gets noticed and appreciated by people who do something similar themselves – other scientists and artists. Continue Reading

Bridging science, art and society

Last year, when I founded NeuroBead, I based it on the idea that scientists like myself would want to see beautiful images from their research commemorated as pieces of art, that they could display on their walls.  Many academic institutions, especially neuroscience departments, decorate their hallways with enlarged photos of cells that were taken under a microscope.  These images are both gorgeous to look at and representative of the great scientific discoveries achieved by the researchers.  They deserve to be preserved and remembered.  Many departments and microscopy facilities even send out calls for best image competitions.  I wanted to take this process one step further and portray this integration of science and visual art in a more creative form. Continue Reading

The dichotomy of art and science 

I have to admit, I have not been here in a while.  Life has been a bit hectic.  Every time I thought about writing, the same topic came to mind – the dichotomy of art and science.  I have written before about how science and art are considered to be at the polar opposite ends of the spectrum of logic and creativity.   How can they live in harmony in one person?  The word “harmony” reminds me of how I have also written about the concept of “flow” described by the Hungarian psychologist Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi.  At that point I have not read the book “Flow” yet, and was only basing my writing on the descriptions of flow I was able to find online.  Based on these descriptions, I was reaching the ultimate state of flow while working on my beadwork. Continue Reading