Dyslexia awareness bracelet

Earlier this year, I wrote about getting involved in creating pieces of art to raise awareness of neurological conditions.  I have made one for epilepsy and acute central nervous system injury.  More recently I was contacted by a former colleague, who asked me to create a jewelry piece to portray dyslexia.   Continue Reading

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Brain-eating amoeba 

After hurricane Irma, Florida might have a greater risk of spreading infection. More specifically, brain-eating amoebas are more likely to thrive in the stagnant water.
These microbes can enter the body through the nose and reach the brain within a few days. There, they begin their feast, which in most cases is fatal.

This work in progress depicts an entry through which the parasite ingests its food – brain tissue.  The piece will evolve to include other elements of this tragic event.  Stay tuned! 

“Tortured”

Here is the second piece I presented at the Women in Bio SciArt event and the story behind it. Continue Reading

Women in Bio SciArt event praise keeps rolling in…

Here is a summary of the SciArt event that was published in Women in Bio newsletter. Continue Reading

“Branching Out”

Here is the first piece I presented at the Women in Bio SciArt event and the story behind it. Continue Reading

Women in Bio Panel – “The Intersection of Art and Science”

As many of you might know, I have spent the last few months on an unplanned “sabbatical”.  When I stopped working, many people have said “now you will have more time for art”.  Little did they know.  Searching for a new opportunity turned out to take up more time and effort than a full-time job.  Surprisingly, I have barely had a chance to sit down at my craft table and enjoy some beading.  But now I actually have a looming deadline… Continue Reading

Bridging science, art and society

Last year, when I founded NeuroBead, I based it on the idea that scientists like myself would want to see beautiful images from their research commemorated as pieces of art, that they could display on their walls.  Many academic institutions, especially neuroscience departments, decorate their hallways with enlarged photos of cells that were taken under a microscope.  These images are both gorgeous to look at and representative of the great scientific discoveries achieved by the researchers.  They deserve to be preserved and remembered.  Many departments and microscopy facilities even send out calls for best image competitions.  I wanted to take this process one step further and portray this integration of science and visual art in a more creative form. Continue Reading